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The 2019 Ronald Ross Lecture Series: Climate Action for Health

Event Details:

  • Date:          Wednesday 8 September 2021
  • Time:          Starts 18:00
  • Venue:       Live streaming of the discussion will be available on The Cyprus Institute’s YouTube Channel and Facebook Channel. If you want to actively participate in
                       the webinar and ask questions to the speaker, you can register and watch the webinar live via GoToWebinar. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email
                       containing information about joining the webinar.
  • Speaker:    Professor Sir Andrew Haines, FRCGP, FRCP, FFPH FMedSci
                       Professor of Environmental Change and Public Health, Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

The 2021 Ronald Ross Lecture Series

Climate Action for Health

Professor Sir Andrew Haines, FRCGP, FRCP, FFPH FMedSci
Professor of Environmental Change and Public Health, Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Wednesday 8 September 2021, 18:00
Online

 
RSVP by Tuesday 7 September, 2021

The lecture will be in English and the event is open to the public.
Live streaming of the lecture will be available on The Cyprus Institute’s YouTube Channel and Facebook Channel. If you want to actively participate in the webinar and ask questions to the speaker, you can register and watch the webinar live via GoToWebinar
Live streaming is facilitated by the CySTEM project funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation program under Grant Agreement No. 667942.
Images and/or recordings of our open public events may be used by The Cyprus Institute for dissemination purposes including print and digital media such as websites, press-releases, social media, and live streaming.

 

Abstract

Climate change is projected to have far-reaching and potentially catastrophic effects on health, with the poor, who have contributed least to emissions, likely to experience the largest impacts. The effects of climate change on health may be direct (e.g. from extreme heat); mediated through ecosystems, such as changes in the incidence and distribution of vector –borne diseases, including dengue and malaria; or mediated through complex socioeconomic pathways such as impoverishment and population displacement. Declines in the production of vegetables, legumes, and fruit could increase the risks of non-communicable diseases. Severe childhood stunting particularly in Africa and South Asia is projected to increase markedly. Floods and droughts can have pervasive impacts, including on mental health. Pre-existing illness such as HIV can increase vulnerability, e.g. to undernutrition as a result of droughts. Increasing heat stress reduces the capacity for physical labour and will therefore reduce income of already deprived populations.

There is evidence that climate change is already having effects on health, for example a recent study, based on data from over 700 sites around the world, suggests that over 30% of heat -related deaths over the past two decades can be attributed to climate change. While human societies can adapt to climate change, there will be limits to adaptation, for example from extreme heat exposure exceeding the physiological capacity to regulate core body temperature in some locations. Implementing policies to promote resilient health systems, able to respond to climate shocks can reduce health effects, but cutting emissions rapidly to achieve the target of the Paris Agreement, to limit global average temperature increase to well under 2°C, will be essential to reduce the risks to health. Many policies to cut greenhouse gas emissions can yield near term improvements in human health, e.g. cutting fossil fuel combustion can reduce ambient air pollution deaths, and increased walking and cycling can reduce both air pollution and the incidence of diseases related to physical inactivity. Providing clean, affordable energy can also reduce deaths from household air pollution. Reduced animal product consumption (particularly from ruminants) in high consuming populations, and increased consumption of fruit, vegetable and seeds, can reduce GHG emissions and improve health. Valuing these co-benefits can make such policies more attractive to decision makers and incentivise climate action.

About the speaker

no user picAndrew (Andy) Haines was formerly a primary care physician and Professor of Primary Health Care at UCL. He developed an interest in climate change and health in the 1990’s and was a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for the 2 nd and 3 rd assessment exercises and review editor for the health chapter in the 5 th assessment. He was Director (formerly Dean) of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine from 2001- October 2010. He chaired the Scientific Advisory Panel for the 2013 WHO World Health Report, the Rockefeller /Lancet Commission on Planetary Health (2014-15) and the European Academies Science Advisory Council working group on climate change and health (2018-19).

He currently co-chairs the InterAcademy Partnership (140 science academies worldwide) working group on climate change and health and is also co-chairing the Lancet Pathfinder Commission on health in the zero-carbon economy. He has published many papers on topics such as the effects of environmental change on health and the health co-benefits of low carbon policies. His current research focuses on climate change mitigation, sustainable healthy food systems and complex urban systems for sustainability.



Programme

Time  Description 
18:00 - 18:10 Welcome words by Prof. Costas N. Papanicolas of The Cyprus Institute
18:10 - 18:15 Opening statement by the British High Commissioner to Cyprus, H.E. Mr Stephen Lillie CMG
18:15 - 18:30 Ronald Ross and Malaria in Cyprus by Prof. George K. Christophides, The Cyprus Institute
18:30 - 19:15 The Ronald Ross Lecture: Climate Action for Health by Prof. Sir Andrew (Andy) Haines, FRCGP, FRCP, FFPH FMedSci
19:15 - 20:00 Questions and Answers, Discussion

 

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This Lecture is part of the Ronald Ross Lecture Series, which is co-organised by The Cyprus Institute and the British High Commission

 

Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.     |     22 208 702

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Additional Info

  • Date: Wednesday 8 September 2021
  • Time: Lecture starts: 18:00
  • Speaker: Professor Sir Andrew Haines, FRCGP, FRCP, FFPH FMedSci
  • Speaker Position: Professor of Environmental Change and Public Health, Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine